How do you teach calling a scene to people new to the game, especially in one-shots and con games?

What is the best way you've found to summarize or shorthand everything a player needs to know in order to call a scene in a Dramasystem game? I'm planning to run a game at a con in November and I was wondering how other people have handled this. If you were making a concise handout, what would you want to stress as the most important ideas?

Comments

  • I go with three simple questions: Where are you? Who are you with? What's happening?

    That tends to be the best order, getting suggestions from the group if the scene caller struggles with any one of them.

    Relatively advanced stuff, like calling a scene you're not in, can come later. People tend to create time jumps without needing it presented as an option up-front: "Can we skip to the night of the party?"
  • Straight-away I'll plug my convention sheets with guide for introducing the game.

    Coalhada's right about Who, What, Where. I often refer to petitions as "emotional asks" because it foregrounds the emotion part. I tell people that that is the most important part of the scene and give them a list of example petitions to reference. If someone goes for a practical ask first I help them drill-down to the emotional part of their ask.
  • Thanks! That's very helpful.
  • What is the best way you've found to summarize or shorthand everything a player needs to know in order to call a scene in a Dramasystem game? I'm planning to run a game at a con in November and I was wondering how other people have handled this. If you were making a concise handout, what would you want to stress as the most important ideas?
    Coalhada Aug 4th 2014
    I go with three simple questions: Where are you? Who are you with? What's happening?

    That tends to be the best order, getting suggestions from the group if the scene caller struggles with any one of them.

    Relatively advanced stuff, like calling a scene you're not in, can come later. People tend to create time jumps without needing it presented as an option up-front: "Can we skip to the night of the party?"
    Joe_Sixpack Aug 4th 2014
    Straight-away I'll plug my convention sheets with guide for introducing the game.

    Coalhada's right about Who, What, Where. I often refer to petitions as "emotional asks" because it foregrounds the emotion part. I tell people that that is the most important part of the scene and give them a list of example petitions to reference. If someone goes for a practical ask first I help them drill-down to the emotional part of their ask.
    Gamera_Spinning Aug 5th 2014
    Thanks! That's very helpful.
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  • Nice posts, mind opening :]
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